ECKERMANN GOETHE GESPRCHE PDF

Gespräche mit Goethe [Johann Peter Eckermann] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ich durchblätterte mit Goethe einige Hefte Zeichnungen meines Freundes Johann Peter Eckerman: Gespräche mit Goethe in den letzten Jahren seines. Conversations Of Goethe has ratings and 23 reviews. Khush said: It is a delightful book. I cannot help giving this book full five stars (This feels w.

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German poet, dramatist, novelist, translator, scientist, and musician, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was the last universal genius of the West and a master of world literature, the author of The Sorrows of Young Werther, Wilhelm Meister, and Faust.

Nowhere else can one encounter a more penetrating, many-sided, and personal Goethe than in the extraordinary Conversa Wckermann poet, dramatist, novelist, gexprche, scientist, and musician, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was the last universal genius of the West and a master of world literature, the author of The Sorrows of Young Werther, Wilhelm Meister, and Faust.

Nowhere else can one encounter a more penetrating, many-sided, and personal Goethe than in the extraordinary Conversations by Johann Peter Eckermanna German author and scholar as well as Goethe’s friend, archivist, and editor. Although only thirty-one when first meeting the seventy-four-year-old literary giant, Eckermann quickly devoted himself to assisting Goethe during his goetue nine years while never failing to record their far-ranging discourse.

Here are Goethe’s thoughts on Byron, Carlyle, Delacroix, Hegel, Shakespeare, and Voltaire, as well as his views on art, architecture, astronomy, the Bible, Chinese literature, criticism, dreams, ethics, freedom, genius, imagination, immortality, love, mind over body, sculpture, and much more. Eckermann’s Conversations —comparable to Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson —allows Goethe to engage the reader in a voice as distinct as it is entrancing.

Paperbackpages. Published Goetge 22nd by Da Capo Press first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Conversations Of Goetheplease sign up. See 1 question about Conversations Of Goethe…. Lists with This Book. May 14, Khush rated it it was amazing. It is a delightful book. I cannot help giving this book full five stars This feels weird, though, to give such books stars.

I like every page of the book. Right at the beginning, Eckermann writes about his impoverished childhood and his realization that he is gifted. Later in the Book, we learn how he gets in touch with Goethe. The book is written in the form of journal entries.

He meets Goethe often and they talk about other writers, books, and so forth. These are indeed delightful moments. Ec It is a delightful book. Eckermann’s fascination with Goethe is absolute.

He sees a lot in him; sometimes it feels like Goethe resides inside him. It is also wonderful to read about Jena, Weimar and such small historical towns. No matter where one lives in the world, one is drawn to the world that the writer describes.

I feel nostalgic about the place, and those meetings where the young meet the established. Eckermann’s meetings with Goethe are full of warmth. I loved listening to their talks. I am also inclined to read a bit more about Goethe after I finished reading this book. Although he is known for his love for women, there is enough about him in his own words, and in the words of others, which indicate his same-sex leanings.

Throughout his life, even though he loved women, he never gave himself to anyone — including his first love. However, he always had great male friends. For instance, the Duke of Weimar was really enchanted with him, and he with the Duke.

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They would spend a lot of time together hunting. Their bonding was so strong that it had annoyed the ministers in the Duke’s staff as if the young poet might taint their Duke. He lived the better part of his life in Weimar against the wishes of his father.

I wonder if anyone researched about his male friends such as the Duke of Weimar. However, I am not at all suggesting that Goethe relationship with Eckermann was homosexual, not at all.

Johann Peter Eckermann – Wikipedia

It is very clear that Eckermann admires Goethe for his work. He probably feels complete in Goethe’s company. What fascinates me about the book is how Goethe emerges in the book.

For instance, it is interesting to note that Goethe was a huge admirer of Winkelmann, and very often in the gexprche, he speaks very highly of Lord Byron. In fact, Byron had met Goethe on several occasions.

As for Winkelmann, after living in Italy for several years when he travelled back to Germany, Goethe as a young man was on cloud nine and waited for him like a lover that is how Walter Pater wrote about Gesprcche and Winkelmann in his wonderful book ‘The Renaissance’.

The book is written in a wonderful language. One thing I would like to do soon is to go and see Weimar.

I admire Eckermann’s sensibility. The book is as much about Goethe as it is about Eckermann. View all 6 comments. It’s hard to say what’s so great about Goethe. One could list all the arts and sciences that he contributed to, but looking honestly at those contributions, none seems to have really remained of fruitful interest to our time, at least not here in the US.

Perhaps the way his influence is currently most felt here is through Waldorf schools, which are based on Rudolph Steiner’s theories, which were elaborations of Goethe’s. But while Waldorf schools seem to do a great job of helping kids turn into It’s hard to say what’s so great about Goethe. But while Waldorf schools seem to do a great job of helping kids turn into good human beings, one can’t say they’re a major cultural force.

I rarely see references to it; selling one’s soul to the devil in exchange for pleasure gesprcje of much concern to a culture that tends to confound pleasure with nearness to God.

Goethe himself believed that his theories about color would be of most lasting value to the world, but these theories seem to be simply irrelevant nowadays, though curiously not disproved.

And yet Goethe was a great man. This will be as clear as a vast and cloudless sky to anyone who reads the conversations that he had with, and that were diligently recorded by, his protege and friend, Johann Eckermann. The first sign of Goethe’s greatness is his enormous capacity to love and attentively notice the works and people whom he perceives as excellent. Goethe pays homage to writers Schiller, Lord Byron, Voltaire, many othersvisual artists most of whom aren’t well known nowstatesmen the local Duke whom he loved and served, and, bafflingly but especially, Napoleonand scientists Humboldt, others.

Johann Peter Eckermann

Goethe is sharp in rebuking anyone who suggests that he is, or that anyone but “a thoroughly rckermann and defective artist” could be, free from influences, i. The finest act the finest art ges;rche indeed hardly attributable to the person who did made it at all, but rather becomes an expression of something superhuman, which he calls “the daemonic spirit.

Also there are lots of contradictions here in Goethe’s thinking, which he is aware of but doesn’t seem to mind terribly: The sixth sign of Goethe’s greatness is his belief in what must be called, for lack of a more precise word, magic.

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It seems that Goethe didn’t commit to any particular religion, nor did he make up one of his own, yet he certainly wasn’t a materialist. I think he didn’t see goerhe reason to codify, or even to discuss at any length, what for him was a living experience.

He simply took pleasure in his sense of “the divine” in nature and rejoiced in others’ ability to do so too. Thankfully, this “divine in nature” never becomes overwrought or forced, but always feels quite simple and even somewhat peculiar, as it should, given the differences between the land from which he arose and that of most readers.

The seventh sign of Goethe’s greatness is that he could become hilariously surly when discussing his detractors, but he preferred, and usually attained, serenity. I especially enjoyed his comments when asked why he didn’t help defend Germany during the Napoleonic wars.

This is clearly a sour subject for Goethe, but he doesn’t try to weasel out of it. He says that he did more than enough for his country by writing great poems, and that, furthermore, a great poet like himself is a citizen of the world so can bear no enmity toward other nations, especially a nation as cultured as France.

This surely unpopular explanation for his pacifism is actually scoffed at in an editorial footnote in my edition of Conversations and might still be controversial today. Also relevant to today are Goethe’s criteria for judging art, though we would apply to movies his thoughts about theater and to pop music his thoughts about poetry. Goethe again with many contradictions loved what was excellent, genuine, and uplifting. He was the first to distinguish classical and romantic art: Most modern productions are romantic — not because they are new, but because they are weak, morbid, and sickly.

And the antique is classic, not because it is old, but because it is strong, fresh, joyous, and healthy. So there are my eight signs of Goethe’s greatness; I’m sure a more perceptive reader could add to the list.

Conversations with Goethe is worth the occasional minor eye-glaze caused by many references to people most of us won’t have heard of. It’s a lively encounter with a great man in the last year of his long, deep life.

Perhaps his views will see a resurgence in popularity someday. That would not be a bad thing for any of us. Sep 23, Ariadne Oliver rated it liked it Shelves: If you are interested in the history and culture of Goethe’s timeas I am, this is well worth reading. Having read some of Goethe’s works it was interesting to find out about his plans, intentions and influences.

Johann Peter Eckermann | German writer |

What does make this an occasionally uncomfortable read is the very uneven relationship between Gesprcue and Goethe. After having known each other for three months, having spent most of that time apart and not communicating, Goethe asks Eckermann to stay in Weimar, not just If you are interested in the history and culture of Goethe’s time eckkermann, as I am, this is well worth reading. After having known each other for three months, having spent most of that time apart and not communicating, Goethe asks Eckermann to stay in Weimar, not just for a while but for his whole life.

And Eckermann accepts because as long as he can have Goethe he’ll be happy. Goethe continues ecksrmann tell Eckermann what he should and shouldn’t do and Eckermann continues to idolize Goethe and fail to see even one tiny flaw in him.